Commentary

The Center fosters dissemination of research on energy policy within Columbia and in the broader academic, business, professional, and public policy communities. While much of the research produced by scholars affiliated with the Center ultimately appears in scholarly books and professional journals, we also publish interesting, rigorous, and topical papers directly. All research produced through the Center is available for free via download on our website.

Commentary

Richard Nephew

Program director Richard Nephew explores what would happen should President-elect Trump attempt to renegotiate the Iran nuclear deal in a new commentary. Nephew outlines and addresses three key questions that face the next Administration: Can the future president get more from Iran as part of a negotiated arrangement?; How much more does he need to get to declare success?; What will he risk in order to get it?

Commentary

Jason Bordoff

Director Jason Bordoff writes in the Wall Street Journal that while the outlook for bipartisan cooperation on energy may seem bleak, it will be important for both sides of the aisle to look for potential areas of common ground after a deeply divisive campaign. Bordoff points to investment in energy research and development as an area which has long enjoyed broad support in both parties as a way to boost American competitiveness.

Commentary

Jason Bordoff

In a written debate/discussion in The Wall Street Journal, Director Jason Bordoff discusses OPEC's relevance and the future of the organization with Helima Croft, head of commodity strategy, RBC Capital Markets and Bassam Fattouh, director of the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies.

Commentary

Jason Bordoff

Director Jason Bordoff writes in The Wall Street Journal that the transition to a low carbon economy brings many positives for the environment and energy security, but will also result in new risks such as cybersecurity.

Commentary

Robert M. Hallman

Last month marked the four-year anniversary of Hurricane Sandy, which devastated communities along the Northeastern coast of the United States and caused significant power, fuel and transportation disruptions to millions of families and businesses in the Tri-State region. In a new commentary, non-resident Fellow Robert Hallman writes that since the storm, considerable progress has been made to improve the resilience of the electric grid and prioritize power restoration to critical fuel supply infrastructure; however, as Hallman outlined in a CGEP report this summer, there is still an urgent need for local governments to do more.

Commentary

Richard Nephew

In a new commentary from the Center on Global Energy Policy, Economic Statecraft, Sanctions and Energy Markets program director, Richard Nephew, questions what will happen to the Iran nuclear deal under a Donald Trump Administration. He indicates that, based on Trump’s rhetoric throughout the campaign season and the realities of what’s needed to maintain the deal, the JCPOA has a high chance of failing.

Commentary

Jason Bordoff

Director Jason Bordoff writes on the path of America's energy policy from independence to interdependence in CIRSD's Horizon's magazine.

Commentary

Jason Bordoff

Director Jason Bordoff writes on how we can look to the Montreal Protocol as a framework to curbing global greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture.

http://blogs.wsj.com/experts/2016/10/16/how-agriculture-can-reduce-green...

Commentary

Antoine Halff

In a new commentary, Program Director Antoine Halff reflects on OPEC’s agreement in Algiers on September 28, the cartel’s first attempt in eight years to manage the oil market through supply cuts. Halff notes that in appearance the deal could indeed be seen as a triumph of self-reassertion and regained market power, but on closer inspection it shows how formidable the challenges facing the organization remain – and how increasingly ill-equipped OPEC appears in its efforts to address them. He details how shifts of deep significance have taken place on at least three fronts: in the oil market; within OPEC itself and in the balance of power between its members; and inside the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Given the magnitude of these changes, the real question is not whether OPEC can execute its proposed cuts but whether opening up its old toolkit can really solve its problems.

Commentary

Center on Global Energy Policy

In his latest commentary piece, Fellow Luay Al Khatteeb writes about the state of the Iraq economic and energy situation. Khatteeb indicates that, on the face of it, the advances made in 2016 by Iraqi forces in central and western Iraq against ISIS are great news for the country's oil and gas production. The retreat of ISIS is also a chance for the deadlocked Iraqi Council of Representatives (CoR) to refocus on much needed economic reform.

Yet ISIS’s retreat raises new challenges. Low prices have kept hydrocarbon revenues at a fraction of their 2014 highs, leaving momentum of production growth in the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) and the oil-rich south difficult. Reconstructing the economies of ISIS-devastated territories will come at enormous cost and the coalition of Kurdish, Shia and Sunni forces that had united in a common fight against ISIS will come under renewed pressure.

In order to unlock the billions of dollars in oil revenues necessary for dealing with 3 million of Internally Displaced People (IDP), both Baghdad and the KRG must work, more than ever before, towards a new constitutional framework and form new arrangements in Basra and Anbar Provinces, home to the northern and southern oil fields, allowing for national level strategic planning to maximize Iraq’s broken “energy value chain.” Without this, rebuilding the freed territories will be mired in political deadlock.

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