Commentary

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Commentary

Richard Nephew

Iranian elections on February 26 appear to have empowered reformist and moderate-leaning candidates, notwithstanding attempts on the part of hardline members of the Iranian government to steer the elections decisively in their own favor.

Commentary

Richard Nephew

Today, the United States, its P5+1 partners, and Iran announced that the formal Implementation Day described in the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) had been reached. This announcement followed on the report by the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Yukiya Amano, that Iran had fulfilled all of its nuclear obligations under the JCPOA and that the agency was in a position to verify this situation going forward.

Commentary

Richard Nephew

The likely decision by the United States to impose new sanctions on Iran’s ballistic missile program and those individuals supporting it follows multiple tests of its prohibited missile systems over the past few months.

Commentary

Jason Bordoff, David Sandalow, Dr. Vijay Modi, Dr. Geoffrey M. Heal , Michael B. Gerrard, Dr. Scott Barrett

Following the historic Paris Agreement last weekend, the Columbia SIPA Center on Global Energy Policy collected commentary on the agreement from several of our scholars and Faculty Affiliates across Columbia University.

Commentary

Robert McNally

In this commentary piece, Bob McNally, a Fellow at the Center on Global Energy Policy and Founder and President of The Rapidan Group, explains how OPEC abdicated the role of market manager over ten years ago--not just in the last year--and that we have already seen the results in a boom (2004–2008) and two busts (2008, 2014–2015) in oil prices. Given oil’s vital role in the global economy, financial markets, and policymaking, coping with elevated price volatility will require the sustained and smart attention of business and government leaders.

Commentary

Antoine Halff

A year after its decision not to cut production in the face of low prices, there is no question that OPEC is feeling the pinch of continued market weakness.

Commentary

Richard Nephew

Last week, the Turkish air force shot down a Russian warplane Ankara claims violated its airspace, setting of warning bells that Russia would respond aggressively in turn.

Commentary

David Sandalow

The Paris climate conference opened yesterday and will continue for two more weeks. At the end, with a small miracle, the 194 nations participating may reach unanimous agreement on some aspects of the world’s response to climate change. But a big part of the legacy of this conference is already written. As the first day of the conference draws to a close, the Paris conference has already delivered important results.

Commentary

Richard Nephew

http://energypolicy.columbia.edu/blog/impact-escalating-tensions-russia-... Impact of Escalating Tensions with Russia on EU and US Sanctions over Ukraine

Commentary

Richard Nephew

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) issued its latest quarterly report on Iran’s nuclear program on Wednesday, November 18. Though the report is itself confidential and restricted to solely IAEA member state governments until released formally by the Board of Governors, it found its way to the internet as it almost always does and has shed some light on the pace and progress of Iran’s implementation of its nuclear commitments under the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). This post offers a few thoughts on how far Iran has come and how far it has yet to go, and speculates as to when formal “Implementation Day” – the day when sanctions relief begins and Iran is free to add significant volumes of oil to the market -- will occur.

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