The Center on Global Energy Policy (CGEP) at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) announced Joe Aldy today as a non-resident Fellow. Aldy's work at the Center will focus on evaluating the fiscal and efficiency implications of renewable energy policies.
 
Aldy is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, a Visiting Fellow at Resources for the Future, and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is also the Faculty Chair for the Regulatory Policy Program at the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government. In 2009-2010, Aldy served as the Special Assistant to the President for Energy and Environment, reporting through both the National Economic Council and the Office of Energy and Climate Change at the White House. Aldy was a Fellow at Resources for the Future from 2005 to 2008 and served on the staff of the President's Council of Economic Advisers from 1997 to 2000. He also served as the Co-Director of the Harvard Project on International Climate Agreements, Co-Director of the International Energy Workshop, and Treasurer for the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists before joining the Obama Administration. He holds a PhD in economics from Harvard University, a Master of Environmental Management degree from the Nicholas School of the Environment, and a BA from Duke University.
 
“Joe will bring tremendous real-world policy experience and academic excellence to the Center,” said Jason Bordoff, founding director of the Center on Global Energy Policy. “Having worked in government and academia at the highest levels he has unique insights to produce policy-relevant research, which is our mission. It's very exciting to have him join our rapidly growing team.”
 
The Fellows Program brings prominent energy thought leaders to the Center on Global Energy Policy to research and write, teach, and otherwise contribute to Columbia University's robust and deep intellectual community focused on energy issues.