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Testimony

Richard Nephew, Program Director, Economic Statecraft, Sanctions and Energy Markets at the Center on Global Energy Policy, testified before the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations on the subject of sanction and the JCPOA.

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Report

Sanctions have become part of the Russian economic landscape since the crisis in Ukraine broke out in December 2013. They have had an impact on the Russian economy, but have yet to change the situation in Ukraine. One possible area for new sanctions is in the field of oil exports. In this issue brief, Richard Nephew, a fellow at the Center on Global Energy Policy and program director for economic statecraft, sanctions and energy markets, examines the possible role that an oil export reduction strategy could play in Russia. In noting the pitfalls and complications, he argues that such a strategy could be part of the overall approach to Russia, but that both different sanctions measures and a holistic approach to Russia-Ukraine policy are necessary for any effort to be successful.

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Testimony

On July 22, Richard Nephew, Director of the Economic Statecraft, Sanctions and Energy Markets program at the Center on Global Energy Policy, testified before the Task Force to Investigate Terrorism Financing on the topic of the Iran nuclear deal and its impact on terrorism financing.

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Commentary

Today saw the announcement of a nuclear deal between Iran and the P5+1. Center Fellow and Program Director Richard Nephew, the former Principal Deputy Coordinator for Sanctions Policy at the Department of State and lead sanctions expert for the U.S. team negotiating with Iran, offered his thoughts and commentary.

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Report

In light of pending negotiations between Iran and the P5+1 we thought you would be interested in the latest issue brief from the Center on Global Energy Policy on the relative impact of low oil prices compared to sanctions on Iran's economy. In it, co-authors Richard Nephew, the Center's Program Director for Economic Statecraft, Sanctions and Energy Markets, and Djavad Salehi-Isfahani, a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and a Professor of Economics at Virginia Tech, find that sanctions relief is essential to Iranian economic recovery, even more so than a rebound in the price of oil.

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Op-ed

For one, oil money ain't what it used to be. And second, Tehran has bigger problems to deal with at home.

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Op-ed

It is now taken as a given by many that, upon completion of a comprehensive nuclear deal, Iran will plow its hard-won sanctions relief into regional adventurism.

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Blog post

June 11, 2015

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Report

The United States currently maintains an asymmetric advantage in the application of economic pressure on partners and adversaries to achieve its national goals, based on its immense economy and position in the middle of the world’s economic activity. But, it is not certain that this advantage will persist in the future or that it will be as strong, as other countries expand and develop economically. This issue brief, authored by Richard Nephew, Program Director for Economic Statecraft, Sanctions and Energy Markets at the Center on Global Energy Policy, argues that the United States should consider the possibility and implications of such a global environment and adjust its sanctions policies accordingly. Nephew is a former director for Iran at the U.S. National Security Council and was a member of the U.S. nuclear negotiating team with Iran from August 2013 to December 2014. The views expressed here are his own.

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