Research
Commentary

In a new commentary, researchers Richard Nephew, Dr. Tim Boersma, and Dr. Tatiana Mitrova assess and analyze the potential impact of new legislation (known as S.94) that would impose statutory sanctions against Russia with respect to its cyber activities, potential responses to its adoption by Russia and the broader market, as well as the likelihood of its passage in Congress. The commentary looks potential responses to its adoption by Russia and the broader market, as well as the likelihood of its passage in Congress.

Research
Commentary

On December 5, 2016, the Mexican government auctioned eleven deep- and ultra-deepwater blocks in the Gulf of Mexico in a bidding round known as Round 1.4. Seven operators won, all credible, highly experienced oil majors and large international exploration and production companies. In a new commentary from the Center on Global Energy Policy, Fellow Adrián Lajous, former CEO of Pemex, explores the efficacy of opening the Mexican upstream to private investment, looking at deepwater Round 1.4 and the limits and shortcomings of its execution.

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Commentary

Richard Nephew examines President Obama's decision to authorize the U.S. government to take three sets of actions in direct response to Russian interference with the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election.

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Commentary

Following a Global Energy Dialogue on the Niger Delta in October 2016 which brought together more than thirty senior international experts, Matthew Page, an expert on Nigeria who recently left the U.S. State Department, authored a policy memorandum which outlines current challenges and opportunities for the Nigeria petroleum sector as well as recommendations to both public and private actors as a first step to resolving some of the issues which have plagued the sector.

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Commentary

Program director Richard Nephew explores what Trump might do in his four years in office from the perspective of economic statecraft and the logical results of his actions.

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Commentary

Jason Bordoff and Richard Nephew examine what reimposing sanctions on Iran would mean for oil markets. They assess the likelihood that sanctions reimposition would pull large volumes of Iranian oil off the market and what impact that would have on oil markets and how the possibility of reimposition affects Iran’s negotiating posture within OPEC.

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Commentary

Richard Nephew explores what would happen should President-elect Trump attempt to renegotiate the Iran nuclear deal in a new commentary. Nephew outlines and addresses three key questions that face the next Administration: Can the future president get more from Iran as part of a negotiated arrangement?; How much more does he need to get to declare success?; What will he risk in order to get it?

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Commentary

On the four-year anniversary of Hurricane Sandy, which devastated communities along the Northeastern coast of the United States and caused significant power, fuel and transportation disruptions to millions of families and businesses in the Tri-State region, non-resident Fellow Robert Hallman writes that since the storm, considerable progress has been made to improve the resilience of the electric grid and prioritize power restoration to critical fuel supply infrastructure; however, there is still an urgent need for local governments to do more.

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Commentary

Richard Nephew questions what will happen to the Iran nuclear deal under a Donald Trump Administration. He indicates that, based on Trump’s rhetoric throughout the campaign season and the realities of what’s needed to maintain the deal, the JCPOA has a high chance of failing.

Research
Commentary

Antoine Halff reflects on OPEC’s agreement in Algiers on September 28, the cartel’s first attempt in eight years to manage the oil market through supply cuts. Halff notes that in appearance the deal could indeed be seen as a triumph of self-reassertion and regained market power, but on closer inspection it shows how formidable the challenges facing the organization remain – and how increasingly ill-equipped OPEC appears in its efforts to address them. 

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