Publications

The Center’s research agenda emphasizes an economic and geostrategic approach to key energy policy areas. Current research programs encompass a wide variety of specific studies and topics, focused both on U.S. policy and specific regions around the world. Below is a list of research reports and working papers authored by Center staff and Fellows, ordered by most recent publication date.

Report

Dr. Tim Boersma

In a paper from the MIT Center for Energy and Environment Policy Research (MITCEEPR), CGEP natural gas program director, Dr. Tim Boersma, writes on Tight Oil Development Economics: Benchmarks, Breakeven Points, and Inelasticities.

Report

Center on Global Energy Policy

Oil price swings are not only a problem for consumer countries but also for producers, particularly those with oil sectors that have a central role in their economies. In a new report by the Center on Global Energy Policy, author Laura El-Katiri explores the response to a downward cycle in oil prices and dwindling revenue streams by the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) economies-- Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Commentary

Richard Nephew

Program Director Richard Nephew writes in Forbes the accomplishments of the Iran Deal and cautions President-elect Trump about implications of renegotiation.

Commentary

Jamie Webster

Nonresident Fellow Jamie Webster writes in The National how the agreement in Vienna is a reminder that OPEC is still influential and capable of collective action.

Commentary

Jason Bordoff

Director Jason Bordoff writes in Thomson Reuters how OPEC has shown flexibility and pragmatism in dealing with the oil price crash. While OPEC may not be controlling the market as they once did, they are still relevant and capable of collective action.

Commentary

Center on Global Energy Policy

Following a Global Energy Dialogue on the Niger Delta in October 2016 which brought together more than thirty senior international experts, Matthew Page, an expert on Nigeria who recently left the U.S. State Department, authored a policy memorandum which outlines current challenges and opportunities for the Nigeria petroleum sector as well as recommendations to both public and private actors as a first step to resolving some of the issues which have plagued the sector.

Commentary

Jason Bordoff

Director Jason Bordoff writes in Thomson Reuters that if President-elect Trump wants to keep his promise to achieve "energy independence," he must continue on the Obama Administration's path of raising fuel economy standards to cut oil use.

Commentary

Dr. James Stock

Nonresident Fellow James Stock writes in The Hill that the EPA's 2017 obligations under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) will allow policymakers to move beyond the debate between big corn and big oil that has plagued RFS policy. Focus can now be placed on the real promise of the standards: the domestic second-generation biofuels that create American jobs, enhance energy security, and significantly reduce carbon emissions.

Report

Center on Global Energy Policy

Since US President Barack Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro announced a historic thaw in US-Cuban relations in December 2014, both the US and Cuban governments have undertaken a series of steps to normalize diplomatic relations and to expand economic ties that had been curtailed since the early 1960s. In a new report from the Center on Global Energy Policy, author Peter Harrell, Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Center for a New American Security, argues that Congress needs to enact new legislation concerning US sanctions on Cuba in order to enable additional positive social and economic changes in Cuba, provide greater economic benefits to both countries, bring sanctions into better alignment with current US interests, and harmonize sanctions on Cuba with sanctions the United States imposes on most other countries subject to US sanctions.

Commentary

Richard Nephew

Program director Richard Nephew explores what Trump might do in his four years in office from the perspective of economic statecraft and the logical results of his actions.

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