Publications

The Center’s research agenda emphasizes an economic and geostrategic approach to key energy policy areas. Current research programs encompass a wide variety of specific studies and topics, focused both on U.S. policy and specific regions around the world. Below is a list of research reports and working papers authored by Center staff and Fellows, ordered by most recent publication date.

Commentary

Jamie Webster

Nonresident Fellow Jamie Webster writes in The National how the agreement in Vienna is a reminder that OPEC is still influential and capable of collective action.

Commentary

Jason Bordoff

Director Jason Bordoff writes in Thomson Reuters how OPEC has shown flexibility and pragmatism in dealing with the oil price crash. While OPEC may not be controlling the market as they once did, they are still relevant and capable of collective action.

Commentary

Center on Global Energy Policy

Following a Global Energy Dialogue on the Niger Delta in October 2016 which brought together more than thirty senior international experts, Matthew Page, an expert on Nigeria who recently left the U.S. State Department, authored a policy memorandum which outlines current challenges and opportunities for the Nigeria petroleum sector as well as recommendations to both public and private actors as a first step to resolving some of the issues which have plagued the sector.

Commentary

Jason Bordoff

Director Jason Bordoff writes in Thomson Reuters that if President-elect Trump wants to keep his promise to achieve "energy independence," he must continue on the Obama Administration's path of raising fuel economy standards to cut oil use.

Commentary

Dr. James Stock

Nonresident Fellow James Stock writes in The Hill that the EPA's 2017 obligations under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) will allow policymakers to move beyond the debate between big corn and big oil that has plagued RFS policy. Focus can now be placed on the real promise of the standards: the domestic second-generation biofuels that create American jobs, enhance energy security, and significantly reduce carbon emissions.

Report

Center on Global Energy Policy

Since US President Barack Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro announced a historic thaw in US-Cuban relations in December 2014, both the US and Cuban governments have undertaken a series of steps to normalize diplomatic relations and to expand economic ties that had been curtailed since the early 1960s. In a new report from the Center on Global Energy Policy, author Peter Harrell, Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Center for a New American Security, argues that Congress needs to enact new legislation concerning US sanctions on Cuba in order to enable additional positive social and economic changes in Cuba, provide greater economic benefits to both countries, bring sanctions into better alignment with current US interests, and harmonize sanctions on Cuba with sanctions the United States imposes on most other countries subject to US sanctions.

Commentary

Richard Nephew

Program director Richard Nephew explores what Trump might do in his four years in office from the perspective of economic statecraft and the logical results of his actions.

Report

Jason Bordoff, Akos Losz

The explosion of US shale has brought expectations of great change for US LNG trade, increasing the volume of flexible cargoes available to markets traditionally dominated by long-term contracts between buyers and sellers. However, new supplies from the United States, combined with new production from Australia and elsewhere, have set the LNG market up for a glut that threatens to depress prices. In a new report by the Center on Global Energy Policy, the authors assess the factors influencing the competitiveness of US LNG around the globe, whether capacity will be curtailed in the near to medium term for economic reasons and how competitiveness of US LNG may evolve in the medium term.

Commentary

Jason Bordoff, Richard Nephew

In a new commentary Jason Bordoff and Richard Nephew examine what reimposing sanctions on Iran would mean for oil markets. They first assess the likelihood that sanctions reimposition would pull large volumes of Iranian oil off the market and then what impact that would have on oil markets and how the possibility of reimposition affects Iran’s negotiating posture within OPEC.

Commentary

Richard Nephew

Program director Richard Nephew explores what would happen should President-elect Trump attempt to renegotiate the Iran nuclear deal in a new commentary. Nephew outlines and addresses three key questions that face the next Administration: Can the future president get more from Iran as part of a negotiated arrangement?; How much more does he need to get to declare success?; What will he risk in order to get it?

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