Publications

The Center’s research agenda emphasizes an economic and geostrategic approach to key energy policy areas. Current research programs encompass a wide variety of specific studies and topics, focused both on U.S. policy and specific regions around the world. Below is a list of research reports and working papers authored by Center staff and Fellows, ordered by most recent publication date.

Report

Dr. Tatiana Mitrova

This study contains a number of scenario studies to assess the share of Russian natural gas in the European natural gas mix going forward. Scenarios were calculated using the NEXANT world gas model (WGM) integrated in ERIRAS modeling information complex SCANER. The calculations in the WGM are based on demand and potential production forecast in each gas producing and/or gas consuming country of the world up to 2040. The paper continues with a discussion of the (limitations of the) most often debated alternatives to Russian gas. The authors conclude that remarkable little changes in the European natural gas mix in the scenarios under study, and that absent very drastic policy interventions Russian natural gas will continue to play a prominent role in the EU.

Commentary

Jason Bordoff

Writing on CFR's Energy, Security, and Climate blog, Founding Director Jason Bordoff discusses why the United States should only use the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in infrequent circumstances to protect the U.S. economy from major supply disruptions around the world.

Commentary

David Sandalow

Clean energy leaders from around the world convene this week in San Francisco for the seventh Clean Energy Ministerial. In this commentary, Inaugural Fellow David Sandalow, who helped launch the Clean Energy Ministerial during his tenure at the U.S. Department of Energy, takes stock. What has the Clean Energy Ministerial accomplished in its first seven years? What should it do for the next seven years? Sandalow offers reflections and recommendations, concluding that the Clean Energy Ministerial is making a real difference but that it can - and must - do more in the years ahead.

Article

Center on Global Energy Policy

The United Nations Panel of Experts on Iran (the ‘Panel’) was established in 2010 pursuant to UN Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1929, with the mandate of monitoring the implementation of UN sanctions imposed on Iran. It fulfilled this role until 16 January 2016, when it was disbanded on the Implementation Day of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA).

On 22 April 2016, International Institute for Strategic Studies, in collaboration with the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University, hosted a workshop designed for the former members of the Panel to share their experience. As the UN Secretariat takes on the task of monitoring the implementation of UNSCR 2231 (the new resolution endorsing the JCPOA and superseding all previous sanctions resolutions on Iran), it will face a number of challenges. Some of these challenges will be unique to the Secretariat’s new mandate but in many areas they will mirror issues faced by the Panel. We asked the Panel to comment on their experience while on the Panel.

Report

David Sandalow

This report reviews the solar PV R&D programs in four countries (the United States, Japan, Germany and South Korea) and proposes a new program -- Solar Together -- to improve national solar R&D programs and speed commercialization of their research results.

Report

Antoine Halff

By the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) reckoning, some 5.5 million barrels of oil — 6% of world demand — get burned daily as bunker fuel on the high seas. Those bunkers are the world’s last big sink for high sulfur residual fuel oil (HSFO), the "bottom of the barrel,” as air-emission rules for ships have to date remained relatively loose. Tighter sulfur regulations may soon change that, with far-reaching impacts for the shipping industry, energy markets and air emissions from ships.

Report

Center on Global Energy Policy

The removal of economic sanctions against a country is not merely a legal event, it is also an important strategic event, intended to facilitate policy and to ensure that the country that was sanctioned avoids doing the behavior in the past that led to sanctions. To help inform public debate on this complex topic the Center on Global Energy conducted research into the case of Myanmar. In this paper, former Treasury Department (OFAC) official Peter Kucik examines the case of Myanmar, its reintegration into the global economy and global financial sector, and lessons learned.

Report

Center on Global Energy Policy

Like the oil market itself, the oil producing countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) are at a crossroads. These countries – which include both members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) like Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait and Qatar, and non-members like Bahrain and Oman – collectively account for the lion’s share of world crude oil and LNG exports.

Article

Jason Bordoff

Writing in Foreign Affairs, Jason Bordoff and Akos Losz discuss how, on the heels of the first ever large-scale shipment of LNG from the US lower 48 states, the new, burgeoning global gas market may well transform energy geopolitics in the years ahead.

Commentary

Richard Nephew

Iranian elections on February 26 appear to have empowered reformist and moderate-leaning candidates, notwithstanding attempts on the part of hardline members of the Iranian government to steer the elections decisively in their own favor.

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