Publications

The Center’s research agenda emphasizes an economic and geostrategic approach to key energy policy areas. Current research programs encompass a wide variety of specific studies and topics, focused both on U.S. policy and specific regions around the world. Below is a list of research reports and working papers authored by Center staff and Fellows, ordered by most recent publication date.

Report

Antoine Halff

By the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) reckoning, some 5.5 million barrels of oil — 6% of world demand — get burned daily as bunker fuel on the high seas. Those bunkers are the world’s last big sink for high sulfur residual fuel oil (HSFO), the "bottom of the barrel,” as air-emission rules for ships have to date remained relatively loose. Tighter sulfur regulations may soon change that, with far-reaching impacts for the shipping industry, energy markets and air emissions from ships.

Report

Center on Global Energy Policy

The removal of economic sanctions against a country is not merely a legal event, it is also an important strategic event, intended to facilitate policy and to ensure that the country that was sanctioned avoids doing the behavior in the past that led to sanctions. To help inform public debate on this complex topic the Center on Global Energy conducted research into the case of Myanmar. In this paper, former Treasury Department (OFAC) official Peter Kucik examines the case of Myanmar, its reintegration into the global economy and global financial sector, and lessons learned.

Report

Center on Global Energy Policy

Like the oil market itself, the oil producing countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) are at a crossroads. These countries – which include both members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) like Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait and Qatar, and non-members like Bahrain and Oman – collectively account for the lion’s share of world crude oil and LNG exports.

Article

Jason Bordoff

Writing in Foreign Affairs, Jason Bordoff and Akos Losz discuss how, on the heels of the first ever large-scale shipment of LNG from the US lower 48 states, the new, burgeoning global gas market may well transform energy geopolitics in the years ahead.

Commentary

Richard Nephew

Iranian elections on February 26 appear to have empowered reformist and moderate-leaning candidates, notwithstanding attempts on the part of hardline members of the Iranian government to steer the elections decisively in their own favor.

Report

Center on Global Energy Policy

In Fall 2015, the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University convened a group of experts from academia, government, industry, nongovernmental organizations and research institutions for a roundtable in London to discuss the implications of the US shale oil and natural gas boom on European energy security and trade. The following document summarizes the event, which was held under Chatham House Rule, supplemented with information from a discussion document prepared for attendees.

Commentary

Richard Nephew

Today, the United States, its P5+1 partners, and Iran announced that the formal Implementation Day described in the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) had been reached. This announcement followed on the report by the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Yukiya Amano, that Iran had fulfilled all of its nuclear obligations under the JCPOA and that the agency was in a position to verify this situation going forward.

Commentary

Richard Nephew

The likely decision by the United States to impose new sanctions on Iran’s ballistic missile program and those individuals supporting it follows multiple tests of its prohibited missile systems over the past few months.

Commentary

Jason Bordoff, David Sandalow, Dr. Vijay Modi, Dr. Geoffrey M. Heal , Michael B. Gerrard, Dr. Scott Barrett

Following the historic Paris Agreement last weekend, the Columbia SIPA Center on Global Energy Policy collected commentary on the agreement from several of our scholars and Faculty Affiliates across Columbia University.

Commentary

Robert McNally

In this commentary piece, Bob McNally, a Fellow at the Center on Global Energy Policy and Founder and President of The Rapidan Group, explains how OPEC abdicated the role of market manager over ten years ago--not just in the last year--and that we have already seen the results in a boom (2004–2008) and two busts (2008, 2014–2015) in oil prices. Given oil’s vital role in the global economy, financial markets, and policymaking, coping with elevated price volatility will require the sustained and smart attention of business and government leaders.

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