Publications

The Center’s research agenda emphasizes an economic and geostrategic approach to key energy policy areas. Current research programs encompass a wide variety of specific studies and topics, focused both on U.S. policy and specific regions around the world. Below is a list of research reports and working papers authored by Center staff and Fellows, ordered by most recent publication date.

Commentary

Robert McNally

In this commentary piece, Bob McNally, a Fellow at the Center on Global Energy Policy and Founder and President of The Rapidan Group, explains how OPEC abdicated the role of market manager over ten years ago--not just in the last year--and that we have already seen the results in a boom (2004–2008) and two busts (2008, 2014–2015) in oil prices. Given oil’s vital role in the global economy, financial markets, and policymaking, coping with elevated price volatility will require the sustained and smart attention of business and government leaders.

Interview

David Sandalow

US Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz sat down with the Center on Global Energy Policy’s David Sandalow at COP21 in Paris earlier this week to discuss climate change and energy innovation. Secretary Moniz highlights the recent announcements of Mission Innovation and the Breakthrough Energy Coalition in the transcript below.

Commentary

Antoine Halff

A year after its decision not to cut production in the face of low prices, there is no question that OPEC is feeling the pinch of continued market weakness.

Commentary

Richard Nephew

Last week, the Turkish air force shot down a Russian warplane Ankara claims violated its airspace, setting of warning bells that Russia would respond aggressively in turn.

Commentary

David Sandalow

The Paris climate conference opened yesterday and will continue for two more weeks. At the end, with a small miracle, the 194 nations participating may reach unanimous agreement on some aspects of the world’s response to climate change. But a big part of the legacy of this conference is already written. As the first day of the conference draws to a close, the Paris conference has already delivered important results.

Commentary

Richard Nephew

http://energypolicy.columbia.edu/blog/impact-escalating-tensions-russia-... Impact of Escalating Tensions with Russia on EU and US Sanctions over Ukraine

Commentary

Richard Nephew

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) issued its latest quarterly report on Iran’s nuclear program on Wednesday, November 18. Though the report is itself confidential and restricted to solely IAEA member state governments until released formally by the Board of Governors, it found its way to the internet as it almost always does and has shed some light on the pace and progress of Iran’s implementation of its nuclear commitments under the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). This post offers a few thoughts on how far Iran has come and how far it has yet to go, and speculates as to when formal “Implementation Day” – the day when sanctions relief begins and Iran is free to add significant volumes of oil to the market -- will occur.

Report

Keith J. Benes, Dr. Johannes Urpelainen

In a new paper for the Center on Global Energy Policy, Dr. Johannes Urpelainen, Associate Professor of Political Science at Columbia University and a Faculty Affiliate at the Center, and his co-authors examine the impact of low oil prices on global fuel subsidies across a number of dimensions. First, the paper explains the benefits of fuel subsidy removal and how low oil prices can enable action. Second, it summarizes key lessons about political obstacles to reform based on original research and the existing literature. Finally, it offers action-oriented recommendations for national and international policymakers, as well as social scientists.

Report

Adrian Lajous

In a new paper for the Center on Global Energy Policy, Fellow Adrian Lajous, who served as CEO of PEMEX from 1994 to 1999, explains why it is critical that Mexico’s government take time to examine the lessons that can be gleaned from the experience of its first two bidding rounds and move carefully in the bidding process for oil fields open to foreign participation. Critically, he argues the Mexican government must be highly selective in the acreage that it will bid out in the coming months, cautiously sequence and pace tenders, and carefully consider a number of deferrals.

Report

Dr. Geoffrey M. Heal

The dramatic fall in oil prices since mid-2014 has raised questions about whether the availability of cheap crude could derail the movement toward lower carbon energy sources, which has been gathering momentum in the last decade and is important to the stabilization of the world’s climate. In a new paper for the Center on Global Energy Policy, Dr. Geoffrey Heal, Donald C. Waite III Professor of Social Enterprise at Columbia Business School, and his co-author Karoline Hallmeyer explore the ways in which oil competes with renewable fuels and examine the impact a lower oil price environment may have on them.

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