Reports

The Center fosters dissemination of research on energy policy within Columbia and in the broader academic, business, professional, and public policy communities. While much of the research produced by scholars affiliated with the Center ultimately appears in scholarly books and professional journals, we also publish interesting, rigorous, and topical papers directly. All research produced through the Center is available for free via download on our website.

Report

Jason Bordoff

Trevor Houser, Jason Bordoff and Peter Marsters offer an empirical diagnosis of the causes of the U.S. coal industry collapse over the last six years, assess the global coal market outlook, and examine the prospects for a recovery in coal production by modeling the impact of President Trump’s executive order to review or rescind Obama-era environment regulations.

Report

Dr. Tim Boersma

Fellow Tim Boersma and Steve Griffiths explore reforming electricity, water, and fuel subsidies in the United Arab Emirates in a report for the Oxford Institute of Energy Studies. The report is part of a larger Oxford Energy Forum issue focusing on MENA price reforms.

Report

Center on Global Energy Policy

Authors Tom Moerenhout, Nikos Vezanis, and Chris Westling analyze the political economy of energy pricing reforms in the Middle East and North Africa since the Arab Spring. This report investigates the conditions under which the governments of Tunisia, Morocco, Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and Iran--each with very different political economies--were able to implement price increases. The report explains for each country why reform was necessary, how political coalitions affected reform planning and implementation, and how social contract dynamics affected the reforms.

Report

Richard Nephew, Dr. Nicola de Blasio

In a three-part series from the Center on Global Energy Policy, three sets of authors examine the future of nuclear energy in the United States and throughout the world.

Report

David Sandalow, Travis Bradford, Peter Davidson

A new report from the Center on Global Energy Policy analyzes whether the success of the oil and gas industry in raising capital could provide insights to help the solar and wind power industries expand.

Report

Dr. Tim Boersma

In a paper from the the Global CCS Institute , CGEP natural gas program director, Dr. Tim Boersma, and co-authors write the challenges related to carbon transportation and storage.

Report

Dr. Tim Boersma

In a paper from the MIT Center for Energy and Environment Policy Research (MITCEEPR), CGEP natural gas program director, Dr. Tim Boersma, writes on Tight Oil Development Economics: Benchmarks, Breakeven Points, and Inelasticities.

Report

Center on Global Energy Policy

Oil price swings are not only a problem for consumer countries but also for producers, particularly those with oil sectors that have a central role in their economies. In a new report by the Center on Global Energy Policy, author Laura El-Katiri explores the response to a downward cycle in oil prices and dwindling revenue streams by the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) economies-- Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Report

Center on Global Energy Policy

Since US President Barack Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro announced a historic thaw in US-Cuban relations in December 2014, both the US and Cuban governments have undertaken a series of steps to normalize diplomatic relations and to expand economic ties that had been curtailed since the early 1960s. In a new report from the Center on Global Energy Policy, author Peter Harrell, Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Center for a New American Security, argues that Congress needs to enact new legislation concerning US sanctions on Cuba in order to enable additional positive social and economic changes in Cuba, provide greater economic benefits to both countries, bring sanctions into better alignment with current US interests, and harmonize sanctions on Cuba with sanctions the United States imposes on most other countries subject to US sanctions.

Report

Jason Bordoff, Akos Losz

The explosion of US shale has brought expectations of great change for US LNG trade, increasing the volume of flexible cargoes available to markets traditionally dominated by long-term contracts between buyers and sellers. However, new supplies from the United States, combined with new production from Australia and elsewhere, have set the LNG market up for a glut that threatens to depress prices. In a new report by the Center on Global Energy Policy, the authors assess the factors influencing the competitiveness of US LNG around the globe, whether capacity will be curtailed in the near to medium term for economic reasons and how competitiveness of US LNG may evolve in the medium term.

Pages