Reports

The Center fosters dissemination of research on energy policy within Columbia and in the broader academic, business, professional, and public policy communities. While much of the research produced by scholars affiliated with the Center ultimately appears in scholarly books and professional journals, we also publish interesting, rigorous, and topical papers directly. All research produced through the Center is available for free via download on our website.

Report

David Sandalow, Keith J. Benes

What do investors and infrastructure developers think about the Paris Agreement? What impact do they believe it will have on the availability of capital for clean energy? In a new paper from the Center on Global Energy Policy, David Sandalow, Keith Benes and Caitlin Augustin report on the results of a survey on these topics. Applying a survey methodology widely used in marketing but not previously used in climate policy analysis, they asked several hundred investors, infrastructure developers and others their views on the Paris Agreement, other national and international policies and climate finance. The survey was conducted both before and after the Paris conference with respondents mostly from the United States and United Kingdom.

Report

A.J. Goulding

As U.S. policy makers and utility stakeholders prepare for the utility of the future, comparisons are often made to the transformation of the telecommunications industry due to wireless technologies. However, a new report by A.J. Goulding, Faculty Affiliate at the Center on Global Energy Policy, indicates that the near-death and subsequent rejuvenation of the U.S. rail system over nearly two centuries also offers lessons for the power sector as it adapts its strategies and regulatory philosophies while planning for the utility of the future.

Report

Center on Global Energy Policy

Gonzalo Escribano outlines the degenerating security conditions in Northern Africa, raising concerns about the ability of Algeria, an OPEC nation, to weather the resulting economic, political and security shocks, and inviting comparisons between the current situation and the catastrophic events experienced by the country during the 1986-1988 oil price collapse and its aftermath. The report discusses the extent to which low oil prices could foster an environment for economic and political reforms, and the benefits that the international community, specifically Europe, could derive from taking advantage of this moment in time to press for new energy policies that improve both supply and overall security.

Report

Richard Nephew

In a new report by the Center on Global Energy Policy, authors Richard Nephew, program director for Economic Statecraft, Sanctions, and Energy Markets at the Center on Global Energy Policy, and David Mortlock, partner and Chair of the Government Relations Group at the law firm of Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP, outline implications of the UK's decision to withdraw from the European Union in relation to the view and execution of economic sanctions policies in both regions. The paper reviews the legal and political history of EU and UK sanctions policies since the Lisbon Treaty came into effect in 2009 as well as three cases of sanctions policymaking and enforcement – against Iran, Russia, and terrorists – to identify common interests and themes, as well as differences in how the UK and EU perceived sanctions enforcement. The report concludes by offering up three observations concerning how the UK and EU will move forward in their respective sanctions policies and two recommendations for how these two entities, along with the United States, should work together to preserve the benefits that existed prior to BREXIT.

Report

Luisa Palacios

Venezuela is facing profound social and political crises, creating the circumstance of a potential catastrophe to come. Beyond the humanitarian concerns that exist, Venezuela has become a supply risk for oil markets, not only because of the multiple operational challenges it has recently faced but also due to the spiraling impact of the steep oil production declines already suffered this year. An important supplier of oil to the United States and China, Venezuela’s oil production declined by almost 230,000 barrels per day during the first six months of 2016. In this new report, author Luisa Palacios, a senior managing director at Medley Global Advisors, head of Latin America Macro and Energy Research and a Fellow at the Center on Global Energy Policy, explores the increasing risks posed by the troubles in this OPEC nation’s oil patch and the unprecedented economic, social and political crisis. The report notes that while the decline in production has yet to translate into a significant fall in oil exports, the most severe threats to the oil market from Venezuela are likely yet to come.

Report

Dr. Tatiana Mitrova

This paper aims to contribute to the literature on the Russia-China energy relationship by providing detailed evidence of activity in the post-sanctions period which we believe demonstrates that China in particular views the relationship in largely commercial terms, with clear political overtones. It provides a most comprehensive and up-to-date review of recent negotiations and transactions, as well as an assessment of the current state of the balance of bargaining power and cooperation between the two countries.

Report

Robert M. Hallman

The large-scale disruption of fuel supplies caused by Superstorm Sandy brought the vulnerabilities of the New York Tri-state fuel supply system into sharp relief. In the three and one-half years since the storm, concerns about extreme weather and overall energy security have only grown, leading policymakers at all levels, fuel suppliers to the region and related power providers to examine how this system can be strengthened against future risks. This report puts forward a series of recommendations to improve communications and overall situational awareness between the private and public sectors to facilitate effective response to fuel emergencies. The report concludes that the current voluntary system of information sharing is inadequate to the needs of the public sector and recommends creating mandatory requirements at various levels to address fuel crises.

Report

Center on Global Energy Policy

Fuel economy standards lie at the center of US efforts to reduce oil consumption and greenhouse-gas emissions. A new report published today by the Center on Global Energy Policy examines the effect low gasoline prices are having on this policy lever. Co-authored by Benjamin Leard, Joshua Linn, and Virginia McConnell of Resources for the Future, the report finds that, during the study period from June 2014 to August 2015, low fuel prices had only a modest effect on meeting the federally required level of fuel economy. If that finding continues beyond the study period, the authors conclude, then low fuel prices will not have a substantial effect on the average fuel economy of new light duty vehicles sales. However, the report cautions that low fuel prices may cause consumers to choose more powerful cars than if fuel prices were higher. Automakers would have to make up the difference if so, which raises the cost of complying with the regulations.

Report

Richard Nephew

One year ago, the United States and its partners concluded their negotiations with Iran on the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), an agreement intended to reduce the threat from Iran's nuclear program in exchange for economic sanctions relief. Implementation of the agreement began in January 2016. Richard Nephew, program director for economic statecraft, sanctions and energy markets at the Center on Global Energy Policy, who was the lead sanctions negotiator for the United States from 2013-2014, has written a report on six months' implementation of the nuclear deal, particularly with respect to sanctions relief. He concludes that sanctions relief has been stalled as much by concerns over residual sanctions as domestic regulatory factors and low oil prices globally.

Report

Dr. Tatiana Mitrova

This study contains a number of scenario studies to assess the share of Russian natural gas in the European natural gas mix going forward. Scenarios were calculated using the NEXANT world gas model (WGM) integrated in ERIRAS modeling information complex SCANER. The calculations in the WGM are based on demand and potential production forecast in each gas producing and/or gas consuming country of the world up to 2040. The paper continues with a discussion of the (limitations of the) most often debated alternatives to Russian gas. The authors conclude that remarkable little changes in the European natural gas mix in the scenarios under study, and that absent very drastic policy interventions Russian natural gas will continue to play a prominent role in the EU.

Pages