Reports

The Center fosters dissemination of research on energy policy within Columbia and in the broader academic, business, professional, and public policy communities. While much of the research produced by scholars affiliated with the Center ultimately appears in scholarly books and professional journals, we also publish interesting, rigorous, and topical papers directly. All research produced through the Center is available for free via download on our website.

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David Sandalow, Travis Bradford

A new report from the Center on Global Energy Policy analyzes whether the success of the oil and gas industry in raising capital could provide insights to help the solar and wind power industries expand.

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Dr. Tim Boersma

In a paper from the the Global CCS Institute , CGEP natural gas program director, Dr. Tim Boersma, and co-authors write the challenges related to carbon transportation and storage.

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Dr. Tim Boersma

In a paper from the MIT Center for Energy and Environment Policy Research (MITCEEPR), CGEP natural gas program director, Dr. Tim Boersma, writes on Tight Oil Development Economics: Benchmarks, Breakeven Points, and Inelasticities.

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Center on Global Energy Policy

Oil price swings are not only a problem for consumer countries but also for producers, particularly those with oil sectors that have a central role in their economies. In a new report by the Center on Global Energy Policy, author Laura El-Katiri explores the response to a downward cycle in oil prices and dwindling revenue streams by the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) economies-- Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

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Center on Global Energy Policy

Since US President Barack Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro announced a historic thaw in US-Cuban relations in December 2014, both the US and Cuban governments have undertaken a series of steps to normalize diplomatic relations and to expand economic ties that had been curtailed since the early 1960s. In a new report from the Center on Global Energy Policy, author Peter Harrell, Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Center for a New American Security, argues that Congress needs to enact new legislation concerning US sanctions on Cuba in order to enable additional positive social and economic changes in Cuba, provide greater economic benefits to both countries, bring sanctions into better alignment with current US interests, and harmonize sanctions on Cuba with sanctions the United States imposes on most other countries subject to US sanctions.

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Jason Bordoff, Akos Losz

The explosion of US shale has brought expectations of great change for US LNG trade, increasing the volume of flexible cargoes available to markets traditionally dominated by long-term contracts between buyers and sellers. However, new supplies from the United States, combined with new production from Australia and elsewhere, have set the LNG market up for a glut that threatens to depress prices. In a new report by the Center on Global Energy Policy, the authors assess the factors influencing the competitiveness of US LNG around the globe, whether capacity will be curtailed in the near to medium term for economic reasons and how competitiveness of US LNG may evolve in the medium term.

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David Sandalow, Keith J. Benes

What do investors and infrastructure developers think about the Paris Agreement? What impact do they believe it will have on the availability of capital for clean energy? In a new paper from the Center on Global Energy Policy, David Sandalow, Keith Benes and Caitlin Augustin report on the results of a survey on these topics. Applying a survey methodology widely used in marketing but not previously used in climate policy analysis, they asked several hundred investors, infrastructure developers and others their views on the Paris Agreement, other national and international policies and climate finance. The survey was conducted both before and after the Paris conference with respondents mostly from the United States and United Kingdom.

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A.J. Goulding

As U.S. policy makers and utility stakeholders prepare for the utility of the future, comparisons are often made to the transformation of the telecommunications industry due to wireless technologies. However, a new report by A.J. Goulding, Faculty Affiliate at the Center on Global Energy Policy, indicates that the near-death and subsequent rejuvenation of the U.S. rail system over nearly two centuries also offers lessons for the power sector as it adapts its strategies and regulatory philosophies while planning for the utility of the future.

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Center on Global Energy Policy

Gonzalo Escribano outlines the degenerating security conditions in Northern Africa, raising concerns about the ability of Algeria, an OPEC nation, to weather the resulting economic, political and security shocks, and inviting comparisons between the current situation and the catastrophic events experienced by the country during the 1986-1988 oil price collapse and its aftermath. The report discusses the extent to which low oil prices could foster an environment for economic and political reforms, and the benefits that the international community, specifically Europe, could derive from taking advantage of this moment in time to press for new energy policies that improve both supply and overall security.

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Richard Nephew

In a new report by the Center on Global Energy Policy, authors Richard Nephew, program director for Economic Statecraft, Sanctions, and Energy Markets at the Center on Global Energy Policy, and David Mortlock, partner and Chair of the Government Relations Group at the law firm of Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP, outline implications of the UK's decision to withdraw from the European Union in relation to the view and execution of economic sanctions policies in both regions. The paper reviews the legal and political history of EU and UK sanctions policies since the Lisbon Treaty came into effect in 2009 as well as three cases of sanctions policymaking and enforcement – against Iran, Russia, and terrorists – to identify common interests and themes, as well as differences in how the UK and EU perceived sanctions enforcement. The report concludes by offering up three observations concerning how the UK and EU will move forward in their respective sanctions policies and two recommendations for how these two entities, along with the United States, should work together to preserve the benefits that existed prior to BREXIT.

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