Stuart Eizenstat was at Jimmy Carter’s side from his political rise in Georgia through four years in the White House, where he served as Chief Domestic Policy Adviser. He was directly involved in all domestic and economic decisions as well as in many foreign policy ones. Famous for the legal pads he took to every meeting, he draws on more than 5,000 pages of notes and 350 interviews of all the major figures of the time, to write the comprehensive history of an underappreciated president―and to give an intimate view on how the presidency works.

On Wednesday, March 27, Eizenstat joined Jason Bordoff, Founding Director, Center on Global Energy Policy and Professor of Professional Practice in International and Public Affairs at Columbia University, and Stephen Sestanovich, Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Professor for the Practice of International Diplomacy at Columbia University, for a discussion of his book, President Carter: The White House Years, which has received positive reviews from major publications including The New York Times, The Washington Post, National Review, National Interest, and many others. Eizenstat recalls lasting transformations in American energy policy, ideas about human rights, relations with Iran and China, Middle East diplomacy, and more. Perhaps Jimmy Carter’s single closest adviser, Eizenstat discussed the achievements, setbacks, and lasting impact — both positive and negative — of one of America’s most controversial leaders.

This event was co-sponsored by the Center on Global Energy Policy and the International Fellows Program.

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This event was open to press. Media inquiries or requests for interviews should be directed to Artealia Gilliard (ag4144@sipa.columbia.edu).

For more information contact: energypolicy@columbia.edu.