CGEP scholars are a go-to a resource for international media, commenting on leading energy and environment news stories. 

2014 News Items

March 2014

"It makes good sense to make sure that the ability ... to deliver oil to the market in a time of emergency has not been impaired by the rapid changes we have seen in the Gulf Coast crude transportation infrastructure," said Jason Bordoff, director of the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University and formerly a senior White House energy adviser.

Even with a few months of natural gas in storage, "they're in a tough spot if those supplies are cut off," notes Jason Bordoff, one-time Obama administration policy advisor and now director of Columbia's Center on Global Energy Policy, who was a speaker on a panel of experts at Columbia University’s School of International and Political Affairs (SIPA) on March 10.

Russian energy – its natural gas and pipelines – give it a big stick over Ukraine and Europe. A lot of leverage. But the U.S. suddenly has a lot of natural gas too – a flood unleashed in a handful of boom years of fracking. Center Director Jason Bordoff and other guests discuss the implications of potential exports of U.S. gas and fracking technology on NPR's On Point.

At a recent event at CGEP, Fueling Up author Trevor Houser says revenue from the U.S. resource boom should be invested in transformative areas like education and infrastructure

A couple of years ago at the energy industry's massive annual gathering, IHS CERAWeek in Houston, the people who pull oil and natural gas out of the ground were largely dismissive of the public's concerns about hydraulic fracturing, commonly known as fracking, said Jason Bordoff, director of the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University. But this year, industry officials are more willing to talk about problems with the technique for getting oil and gas from shale-rock formations, and to discuss how they intend to fix them. "There is a better appreciation for the need to take seriously the need to protect the public and reassure the public this shale boom can be done safely," Mr. Bordoff said.

The panel, which included Richard Betts, director of SIPA’s International Security Policy programme, Jan Svejnar, former presidential candidate in the Czech Republic, Valery Kuchinsky, retired career diplomat for Ukraine, Peter Clement, former deputy director, CIA Directorate of Intelligence, and Jason Bordoff, former special assistant to President Obama, pointed to the power struggle that continues from the Cold War era.

Russia is the world's top natural gas exporter, but the U.S. is the top producer. Jason Bordoff, director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, explains efforts to get American gas to Europe.

A couple years ago at the massive energy confab held in Houston every year, the people who pull oil and gas out of the ground were largely dismissive of the public’s concerns about hydraulic fracturing (fracking), said Jason Bordoff, director of the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University. But this year, industry officials are more willing to talk about problems with the technique for getting petroleum from shale formations, and to discuss how they intend to fix them. “There is a better appreciation for the need to take seriously the need to protect the public and reassure the public this shale boom can be done safely,” Mr. Bordoff said.

Over the next decade, the notion of U.S. LNG and crude exports becoming a political tool, and not just an economic one, could be very real, said Jason Bordoff, director of Columbia University's Center on Global Energy Policy. "I think as a policy matter in the longer term, you want to think about the sort of steps the U.S. could take with other countries in Europe to create more supply diversity and more competition in the gas market to reduce Russia's ability to use gas for leverage," Bordoff said in an interview.

The swift emergence of shale production is forcing Washington to weigh in on a series of energy-related policy questions, from logistics infrastructure to the current ban on oil exports. "There is always some measure of policy uncertainty as government takes time to develop new rules and regulations, but there are an especially large number of energy policies that require a rethink today as a result of the rapid shift in the U.S. energy landscape," says Jason Bordoff, director of the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University and a senior White House energy adviser until late 2012.

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