utility
Research
Report

As U.S. policy makers and utility stakeholders prepare for the utility of the future, comparisons are often made to the transformation of the telecommunications industry due to wireless technologies. However, A.J. Goulding indicates that the near-death and subsequent rejuvenation of the U.S. rail system over nearly two centuries also offers lessons for the power sector as it adapts its strategies and regulatory philosophies while planning for the utility of the future.

Research
Article

Director Jason Bordoff writes on the path of America's energy policy from independence to interdependence in CIRSD's Horizon's magazine.

Research
Report

Richard Nephew and David Mortlock outline implications of the UK's decision to withdraw from the European Union in relation to the view and execution of economic sanctions policies in both regions. 

Iran, sanctions
Research
Commentary

Richard Nephew argues that far from only imposing sanctions or sanctions-like authorities when U.S. interests are directly impinged, sanctions are increasingly being used as a substitute for more effective action, to avoid taking more risky (but probably necessary) action, and to address domestic political needs in the United States. He uses the example of bill H.R. 5461, or the Iranian Leadership Asset Transparency Act as one example of when the United States should choose not to act (i.e. not pass the bill). 

Research
Op-ed

Writing in The Hill, Faculty Affiliate Dr. Johannes Urpelainen urges for G-20 nations to come together and eliminate fuel subsidies, noting that there is not a one-size-fits-all appoach.

Research
Commentary

Matt Robinson and Richard Nephew argue that the most strategic choice for Washington lawmakers to address the crisis in Venezuela was not to act, but instead to permit the situation in Venezuela  tounravel on its own. In this, the United States has demonstrated a considered approach to statecraft by avoiding the temptation to involve itself in the situation in Caracas.

Research
Op-ed

Writing in The Hill, Richard Nephew explains the history and reality of the so-called “ransom payment” made to Iran by the United States in January 2016 of $400 million, which is now the subject of such controversy.

Research
Report

Bob Hallmann puts forward a series of recommendations to improve communications and overall situational awareness between the private and public sectors to facilitate effective response to fuel emergencies. The report concludes that the current voluntary system of information sharing is inadequate to the needs of the public sector and recommends creating mandatory requirements at various levels to address fuel crises.

Research
Report

Co-authors Benjamin Leard, Joshua Linn, and Virginia McConnell examine the effect low gasoline prices are having on this policy lever. 

Research
Op-ed

Writing on CNBC.com, CGEP Fellow Carlos Pascual writes that for the next U.S. president, no foreign policy choice will be more important than deciding whether and how to end a stalemate of conflict in the Middle East. The challenges will be daunting. But turning a blind eye to the region's deteriorating realities will ensure that the dangers and threats only grow, he argues.

Pages